We almost certainly haven’t seen the last of these two.
Photo: Marvel Studios

WandaVision may have aired a series finale on Disney+ — one literally called “The Series Finale,” no less — but nothing is really final in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Going all the way back to 2008’s Iron Man, practically every film in the now-massive franchise has set up and teased future projects in its closing and post-credit scenes, and WandaVision is no exception. Wanda may have become the Scarlet Witch and said good-bye to her fabricated husband and sons, but the action of this show is clearly going to have an impact on future MCU projects, likely as soon as Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness next year. Much has been written about how WandaVision led to revisits and even reappraisals of Avengers: Age of Ultron, so it could be a few years before a new film or show reveals the true impact of this series, too. And maybe it will answer these questions.

[Major spoilers follow.]

After her battle with Agatha Harkness, Wanda Maximoff seems to embrace her new future as the Scarlet Witch, telling Monica, “I don’t understand this power, but I will.” But maybe Agatha was right about the Scarlet Witch being dangerous to all mankind? In the show’s post-credits scene, a reclusive Wanda can be seen studying the Darkhold, an ancient volume of dark magic Agatha has been using all season. This isn’t good news for those who hoped WandaVision might derail rumors that its star could end up as the villain in the upcoming Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. An old casting synopsis for that film reads as follows: “Dr. Stephen Strange’s continuing research on the Time Stone is hindered by a friend turned enemy, resulting in Strange unleashing unspeakable evil.” Does the end of WandaVision set up its protagonist as the friend turned enemy in the Doctor Strange sequel? It sure seems that way. (Edit: Thanks to the astute commenters who’ve pointed out this friend-turned-enemy is rumored to be Chiwetel Ejiofor’s Baron Mordo. But hey, who says a multiverse cant have multiple friends-turned-enemies?)

If anything is likely to derail Wanda from the path of evil, it’s a reunion with her life partner, but he won’t exactly be the version of Vision that she created in Westview. In their final encounter, however, the Wanda-created model of Vision “awakens” the memories of the White Vision, and he soars off into the sky after saying, “I am Vision.” With the memories of Wanda’s and Vision’s time with the Avengers reignited in his programming, will this make the White Vision into the charming, lovable version of Vision that Wanda loves? These characters feel linked more than ever and became one of the essential relationships in the MCU through WandaVision. If Wanda returns in the next Doctor Strange movie, it’s logical to think the new version of Vision will, too, but how much will he resemble the one from this show? It’s a fine line for the MCU writers to walk, in that merely reuniting the two may make the emotional end of this series feel cheap, but there’s no way we’ve seen the last of Vision, right?

Back to the post-credits scene! While studying how to be evil from the Darkhold, Wanda hears her children calling for help. Where are they? And why does it sound so much like the cries they made in episode eight when trapped by Agatha? Let’s go down a rabbit hole for a minute: Wanda seems likely to return in the next Doctor Strange movie, those films play with the ideas of multiverses — it’s in the title — and there have been rumors that the next Spider-Man movie will do the same. Could Wanda’s new powers allow her to hear an alternate universe where she doesn’t perform her own version of the Snap on her magical children? Could she then bring them into the “real world”? And if she does …

Marvel has roughly 400 projects in production, and there’s a prominent rumor that one of them is a film or TV series based on the Young Avengers comic book. Guess who’s in the Young Avengers: That’s right, Vision and Wanda’s kids, Tommy and Billy, a.k.a. Speed and Wiccan, respectively. So when WandaVision introduced the young versions of two eventual members of a team that will center a potential future project, it seemed logical that Marvel was setting up an origin story of sorts for that project … and then those cute kids disappeared. How exactly Speed and Wiccan will get from Westview to the new team is unclear, but it feels as if that line will eventually have to be drawn.

It turns out Evan Peters wasn’t really playing Pietro Maximoff for the second time as much as he was playing Ralph Bohner for the first time. The finale reveals that “Fietro” was actually a struggling actor named Ralph Bohner who lived next door to Wanda and Vision and was controlled by Agatha Harkness (that would be the “Ralph” that Agnes keeps referring to as her husband on the shows-within-a-show). Sorry to everyone who posted on message boards about how the casting of Peters opened the door for Magneto and Professor X to pop up in the series finale. Ralph doesn’t know them. Now that the X-Men universe is part of the Disney monopoly, the inclusion of Peters’s version of Quicksilver led people to theorize about how quickly Wolverine could cross paths with Thor. And that could still be the future. Was the inclusion of an actor from the X-Universe a nod to the future or a fun one-off game? Only time will tell.

Monica Rambeau has clearly been forever altered by her journeys into and out of Westview this season. Her powers reach their apex in the finale when Hayward tries to shoot Tommy and Billy and Monica jumps in the way, the bullets going through her body and falling to the ground. From the minute Monica went back into Westview and could see electricity in the air, fans suggested the show was also an origin story for Photon, a superhero alias of Monica from the books. Believe it or not, Monica Rambeau was also Captain Marvel herself for years, taking the title in 1982 and even joining the Avengers in 1983. However, she handed off the Marvel title in 1996 and became Photon. She barely has an origin story in the books, but that’s changed on WandaVision.

In the mid-credits scene, Monica/Photon has a meeting with someone who reveals herself to be a Skrull and says Monica is needed elsewhere as she points upward. (The “he” who has asked for Monica is widely rumored to be Nick Fury, by the way.) Where exactly Monica is headed in the universe isn’t completely clear, but she’s almost certainly going to be part of Captain Marvel 2, which is set for a late 2022 release. At this point, it would be stunning if she weren’t a major character in that film.

Probably not. Whenever a Marvel character ends an interaction with “I’ll be seeing you,” it’s a promise that’s typically kept. At the end of WandaVision, Wanda traps the powerful Agatha Harkness in her sitcomish Agnes form, leaving her in Westview. Agatha feels like too strong a character to leave behind forever, and it wouldn’t be all that surprising to see her as soon as Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, would it? After all, her follow-up to Wanda’s line feels important too: “Not if I see you first.”

Randall Park and Kat Dennings added a great deal of fun energy to WandaVision, and it would be sad if fans had to wait years for their return or if they were relegated to cameos in MCU movies from now on. Let’s get them a show! Jimmy and Darcy travel the country solving Marvel-related cases like a modern Mulder and Scully! Teyonah Parris guest stars on a very special episode every now and then! It would be massive.

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